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WRITING STYLES > CHICAGO MANUAL OF STYLE > How to Format a Paper in Chicago Style > How to Write a Thesis or Dissertation in Chicago Style > How to Create a Bibliography or Reference List in Chicago Style > How to Cite Sources Inside the Text in Chicago Style Paper > How to Create Headings and Endnotes in Chicago Style > What Pages Do I Need with My Chicago Style Paper > How to Format a Paper in Chicago Style / Turabian Style > Tips for Writing in Chicago Style > Chicago Style vs. MLA Style > Chicago Style vs. APA Style > MLA STYLE > APA STYLE


Chicago Manual of Style:
What Pages Do I Need in My Paper?
by Peter Gallagher

Chicago Manual of Style offers several possibilities for selecting which pages to add to your thesis paper or dissertation. Some pages are necessary, while other pages are recommended but optional. I have itemized the page types (below) according to the the order that you should include them. Always begin each section on a new page. Most of these sections will require just a single page.

A) TITLE PAGE. Obviously, your paper must have a Title page. Double-space all text using uppercase characters. Center the text both horizontally and vertically. Start with the name of the college or university, succeeded by the title. Next, list the committee to whom you're submitting your paper, followed by the department or college. Next, include the word "BY" on a separate line, followed by the author's name. Lastly, include your city and state, along with the month and year of graduation. Put extra horizontal lines between each section on the Title page, and then center it vertically on the paper. Remember that the Title page is the first of the "display" pages according to Chicago Manual of Style, but you do NOT number it.

B) COPYRIGHT PAGE OR BLANK PAGE. This page is the second page of your paper; it will either be a blank page or a copyright notice page. The customary "blank page" protects against text from the main page from seeping through to the Title page. If you decide to use a page to display a copyright notice, then (near the bottom of the page) type "Copyright," the copyright symbol, the year in which you completed the paper, and your name as the author. On the following line, indent and type, "All rights reserved" (do not use punctuation marks). Just like the Title page, do NOT number this page either, but but do count it in your pagination. The next display page will be "iii" in Roman numerals.

C) THE DEDICATION PAGE. A Dedication page is an optional page to whom you wish to dedicate your paper. Simply type "To" followed by the name of the person(s).

D) THE EPIGRAPH PAGE. The Epigraph page is an optional page that allows you to include a poem or quotation relevant to the introduction of your paper.

E) TABLE OF CONTENTS. Many writers include a "Table of Contents" page to organize their papers (depending on length); however, it is an optional page. If you feel that your paper would not benefit from such a page, then omit it. If you decide to add a Table of Contents, then number it as part of the display pages. This special page organizes the contents of your paper, supplying precise page numbers to specific sections and headings. Readers use the Table of Contents to skip to a specific section. When adding chapter headings to the Table of Contents, check that they correctly match the chapter headings in the text. Use a leader to associate the chapter heading or section name (lined up on the left) with the page number (lined up on the right). Type and center the word(s) "CONTENTS" or "TABLE OF CONTENTS" at the top of the page.

F) LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS AND LIST OF TABLES. Use these optional display pages only when you have illustrations, visuals, figures and tables in your paper. List each visual or table with the correct title and page number, united by a leader. Right-align the page number and left-align the title of each table or visual.

G) PREFACE PAGE. As an optional display page, the Preface lets you briefly explain what motivated you to undertake the subject of your thesis, and also acknowledge special individuals who had contributed to your research.

H) LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS OR GLOSSARY. If your paper contains many odd abbreviations or terms, then you can list them on a separate page. Such a page is optional and is only needed in special cases.

I) THE ABSTRACT PAGE. Add an Abstract page to recap briefly the contents of your paper. This, too, is an optional display page.

J) MAIN TEXT PAGE. The main text page is the heart and soul of your paper. Start numbering the main text with Arabic numerals; hence, you no longer use the lowercase Roman numerals from the display pages. Put each Arabic page number in the upper right corner of each page. If you have a chapter heading or a main heading at the top of a page, then you can center the page number at the bottom of the page.

K) THE APPENDIX PAGE. If you have extra material that does not complement your main text, then you can create an optional Appendix page. Sometimes you may have complex tables, equations, or technical notes that would ruin the coherency of your main text. An Appendix page can accommodate such situations. You are allowed to include more than one Appendix. Each Appendix must address a different concept or topic. Number each one either with letters or numbers, such as "Appendix A" and "B" and "C."

L) THE BIBLIOGRAPHY OR REFERENCE LIST PAGE. Add your Bibliography on a new page after the final main text page or final Appendix page. The Reference List page must provide all works that you've cited in your paper, arranged alphabetically. Keep using the Arabic page numbering all through the Bibliography page(s).

© Peter Gallagher, Brian Scott, LousyWriter.com

WRITING STYLES > CHICAGO MANUAL OF STYLE > How to Format a Paper in Chicago Style > How to Write a Thesis or Dissertation in Chicago Style > How to Create a Bibliography or Reference List in Chicago Style > How to Cite Sources Inside the Text in Chicago Style Paper > How to Create Headings and Endnotes in Chicago Style > What Pages Do I Need with My Chicago Style Paper > How to Format a Paper in Chicago Style / Turabian Style > Tips for Writing in Chicago Style > Chicago Style vs. MLA Style > Chicago Style vs. APA Style > MLA STYLE > APA STYLE






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