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THE PARTS OF SPEECH [ ? ]
> Adjectives
> Adverbs
> Articles
> Conjunctions
> Nouns
> Pronouns
> Prepositions
> Verbs : Verbals
> Vowels : Consonants
CHEAT SHEETS
> Violations of English Words
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> Possessive nouns
HOW TO WRITE BETTER
> Ad Copy
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PLAIN ENGLISH WRITING ( What is? )
> Plain English Material
> Jargon and Legalese
> Active Voice
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> Using plain English
WRITING STYLES
> APA Style
> MLA Style
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GRAMMAR ( What is? )
> The English Grammar
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> Most confusing English Words
GRAMMAR MISTAKES
> Attraction
> ALONE (usage)
> AND relative
> Broken Construction
MISUSED ENGLISH WORDS
> Aggravating, Irritating
> Both, Each, Every
> Continual, Continuous
> Decided, Decisive
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CAPITALIZATION ( What is? )
> Book Titles
> First Words
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PUNCTUATION ( What is? )
> Apostrophe
> Colon
> Comma
> Dash
FIGURES OF SPEECH
> What is a figure of speech?
> the Simile
> the Metaphor
> Personification
WORD CLASSES
> Word Groups
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VERBS : What is a Verb? : Verbs - Person & Number : Shall / Will (usage) : Active Voice : Passive Voice : Verb Tenses : Rules for Verb Tenses : Mood : Imperative Mood : Indicative Mood : Subjunctive Mood : Intransitive Verbs : Transitive Verbs : Linking Verbs : Most Troublesome Verbs

What is a Linking Verb?

What is a Linking Verb?When we use a verb to connect the subject of a sentence with a predicate noun, pronoun, or adjective, we call it a "linking verb." Linking verbs do not convey action.

In the sentence, It was a sunny afternoon, the intransitive verb was is followed by the predicate noun afternoon. The verb was is used to link the subject It with the predicate noun afternoon. We call this type of verb a linking verb.

The most commonly used linking verbs include: be, is, are, was, were, have been, etc. We also frequently use walk, appear, turn, become, feel, grow, look, seem, smell, remain, sound, taste, etc. as a form of linking verbs.

NOTE— We can always recognize a linking verb because a predicate word follows it —a noun, a pronoun, or an adjective in the predicate defines or describes the subject of the sentence.

The following sentences include linking verbs:

ETC.— Does the nurse herself feel sick? (Is she sick?)
ETC.— This museum feels chilly (is chilly).
ETC.— The boss looked angry (was angry).
ETC.— The Tower of Pisa does not stand straight (is not straight).
ETC.— The evening dinner tasted delicious (was delicious to the sense of taste).

Usually we can refer to a linking verb if we can subtitute some form of the verb is without greatly changing the meaning of the sentence.

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VERBS : What is a Verb? : Verbs - Person & Number : Shall / Will (usage) : Active Voice : Passive Voice : Verb Tenses : Rules for Verb Tenses : Mood : Imperative Mood : Indicative Mood : Subjunctive Mood : Intransitive Verbs : Transitive Verbs : Linking Verbs : Most Troublesome Verbs





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