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THE PARTS OF SPEECH [ ? ]
> Adjectives
> Adverbs
> Articles
> Conjunctions
> Nouns
> Pronouns
> Prepositions
> Verbs : Verbals
> Vowels : Consonants
CHEAT SHEETS
> Violations of English Words
> Homonyms
> Homogeneous words
> Possessive nouns
HOW TO WRITE BETTER
> Ad Copy
> Blog Copy
> Resume
> Sales Letter
PLAIN ENGLISH WRITING ( What is? )
> Plain English Material
> Jargon and Legalese
> Active Voice
> Plain English Gobbledygook
> Using plain English
WRITING STYLES
> APA Style
> MLA Style
> Chicago Style
GRAMMAR ( What is? )
> The English Grammar
> Plain English Style
> Most confusing English Words
GRAMMAR MISTAKES
> Attraction
> ALONE (usage)
> AND relative
> Broken Construction
MISUSED ENGLISH WORDS
> Aggravating, Irritating
> Both, Each, Every
> Continual, Continuous
> Decided, Decisive
> Show all
CAPITALIZATION ( What is? )
> Book Titles
> First Words
> Titles of People
PUNCTUATION ( What is? )
> Apostrophe
> Colon
> Comma
> Dash
FIGURES OF SPEECH
> What is a figure of speech?
> the Simile
> the Metaphor
> Personification
WORD CLASSES
> Word Groups
> Spoken and Written Words
> Motion Words

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PREPOSITIONS : What is a preposition? : Words followed by special prepositions : Examples of using prepositions : Common prepositions : Errors in using prepositions

Words Followed by Special Prepositions

Words Followed by Special PrepositionsUsing the correct preposition after a word sometimes depends on which word you use. In the following examples, we underline the writer's choice of word along with the correct preposition to use.

Accommodate with a desirable or needed thing.

He accommodated me with a soft bed.

Accommodate to, to adapt.

They accommodated themselves to their surroundings.

Accused of crime or offense.

He has been accused of stealing the bicycle.

Accused by a person.

The young employer was accused by his employer.

Adapted for something by nature.

The southern plantation was adapted for cotton.

Adapt from an author.

The movie was adapted from J.K. Rowling's "Harry Potter" book.

Adapt to a thing.

Consumers have adapted to the new high gas prices.

Agree to a plan, a proposal, or an opinion.

He agreed to the plans of his friends.

Agree with a person.

He agreed with me that we should eat at another restaurant.

Agree upon a decision.

The executives agreed upon a different advertising campaign.

Angry at a thing.

The customer became angry at the poor service.

Angry with a person.

The customer became angry with the waiter.

Attend to business.

My boss attends to all the business needs of the office.

Attend upon a person.

Te nurse attended upon the bed-ridden patient.

Attended by a person.

The vactioners were attended by a tour guide.

Attended with consequences.

The rainy season in Florida was attended with heavy losses of oranges.

Beset by evils.

Last year many banks were beset by foreclosures.

Beset with arguments.

The crafty saleswoman beset her customer with many benefits of the product.

Communicate to a person, to give information to.

The President has communicated to the public about raising taxes.

Communicate with a person, to speak or write to.

I communicated with my boss via Facebook.

Compare to unlike things.

His work ethic can be compared to a laundry machine.

Compare with like things or similar qualities.

Our technology compares favorably with our competitors' products.

Consist in, to have the substance, foundation, or character.

Learning how to write consists in learning about grammar.

Consist of, to be made of or composed of.

Our store consists of groceries and party supplies.

Confide in, to trust in.

My neighbor gladly confided in me to watch her dog over the weekend.

Confide to, to trust to.

The worker confided to his boss several complaints about other employees.

Die of disease (not from disease).

Last year so many people died of influenza that the medical company suspended payment of insurance settlements.

Differ from a person or thing in likeness.

Our new Dell computer differs greatly from the new HP Pavillion computer.

Differ with, in opinion.

The baseball team differs with other teams concerning the new scoring system.

Different from (not different than or to).

Your work in the office is different from mine.

Do not say, "Your work in the office is different than mine."

Part from a person.

It was hard to part from my girlfriend.

Part with a thing.

It always feels good to part with your money for charity.

Argue against a thing.

The managers of the restaurant argued against the closing order issued by the Board of Health.

Argue with a person.

The clerk stopped to argue with his manager.

Taste for literature, music, art, etc.

To improve your writing, develop a taste for classic literature.

Taste of food.

The taste of warm apple pie brought back memories of my childhood.

Omit of when you use taste as a verb: "Taste the pie."

For a complete list of common words with their prepositions, refer to our Cheat Sheet of Prepositions.

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PREPOSITIONS : What is a preposition? : Words followed by special prepositions : Examples of using prepositions : Common prepositions : Errors in using prepositions





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