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MISUSED ENGLISH WORDS > Aggravating, Irritating > Both, Each, Every > Continual, Continuous > Decided, Decisive > Existing, Extant > First, Second, Secondly > Good, Well > Human, Humane > Identity, Identification > Learn, Teach > Materialize, Appear > Negligence, Neglect > Observation, Observance > Prescribe, Proscribe > Relationship, Relation > Sewage, Sewerage > Transpire, Happen > Union, Unity > Visitant, Visitor > Show ALL


MISUSED CONJUNCTIONS

Conjunctions are few in number and are more definite in their meanings than prepositions. Most errors in using them spring from confused thinking or hasty writing. "A close reasoner and a good writer in general may be known by his pertinent use of connectives."

AND.—And has, generally speaking, the meaning of “in addition to.”

BUT.—But implies some exception, opposition, or contrast. Equivalent, or nearly equivalent, expressions are “however,” “on the other hand,” “yet,” “nevertheless.”

AS.—“As has so many meanings that it is better, when possible, to use a conjunction that covers less ground.”

BECAUSE, FOR, SINCE.—The difference between these words is chiefly a difference in emphasis. “We will not go, because it is raining” is the strongest way of expressing the relation of cause and effect. In “Since it is raining, we will not go,” the emphasis is shifted from the cause to the effect, which becomes the prominent idea. In “We will not go, for it is raining,” the reason, “it is raining,” is announced as itself a bit of news. Often the choice between these words is decided by the ear.

HOW.—How properly means “in what manner” or “to what extent.” It is often misused for “that” to introduce an object clause.

NOR, OR.—Nor is the correlative of neither, sometimes of other negatives. Or is the correlative of either.

THEREFORE, SO.—In the sense of “for this reason,” therefore is preferable to so, since so has other meanings.

THOUGH.—Though means “notwithstanding,” “in spite of the fact that.”

AS IF, AS THOUGH.—“As if is, on the whole, preferable to as though.”

WHEN, WHILE.—When means “at the time that;” while, “during the time that,” “as long as.” “When fixes attention on a date or period; while fixes attention on the lapse of time.”

MISUSED ENGLISH WORDS > Aggravating, Irritating > Both, Each, Every > Continual, Continuous > Decided, Decisive > Existing, Extant > First, Second, Secondly > Good, Well > Human, Humane > Identity, Identification > Learn, Teach > Materialize, Appear > Negligence, Neglect > Observation, Observance > Prescribe, Proscribe > Relationship, Relation > Sewage, Sewerage > Transpire, Happen > Union, Unity > Visitant, Visitor > Show ALL