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What are Conjunctive Adverbs?

What are Conjunctive Adverbs? Some adverbs join the principal clauses of a compound sentence. You should use a comma and a coordinating conjunction or a semi-colon to connect the clauses:

EX.— The players were in a hurry to go, and so they did not wait for the bus.

EX.— The players were in a hurry to go; so they did not wait for the bus.

Some conjunctive adverbs are: so, thus, also, hence, consequently, moreover, still, nevertheless, therefore, however.

Subordinating Conjunctive Adverbs

When adverbs join subordinate clauses to the words in the sentence which they modify, we refer to them as subordinating conjunctions. These include: as, when, where, while, since, though, although, as-if, if, than, before, until, till, unless, for, wherever, whenever, whereas, etc.

EX.— I will go to the baseball field when school is out.
EX.— You should see our theater while you are here.
EX.— They will arrive tonight if the bus is on time.

Special Distinctions

1) Some and Somewhat

Some is a pronominal adjective: I have some money.
Somewhat is an adverb: I am somewhat low in funds.

2) Good and Well

Good is an adjective: He does good work.

Well is either an adverb or an adjective: He works well (adverb). He is not well (adjective) enough to work.

3) Only and Alone.

Alone is an adjective: Ourselves, alone at the party (adjective).

Only is either an adverb or an adjective: The car stops at this crossing only (adjective). No, it only (adverb) slows; it doesn't stop.

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